Gone Crabbing

  Team stupid (Intern, German, Engineer)  and two guest members (Jim, Chris) went crabbing in Newport, Oregon this weekend. Newport is on the Oregon Coast, as most crabs can be found in the ocean. Once we arrived in Newport, we went to a local sporting goods store and studied up on the sport of crabbing. We were under the impression that we we'd have to rent a boat and paddle out on the open ocean, but apparently there were plenty of crabs to be caught just off the pier. Or so we thought... Equipped with three crabbing rings, a couple of dead minks, half a dozen of salmon heads and 48 cans of Coors Light (you have to stay hydrated); our athletic journey began at about 3pm. Ten hours later, here's what had happened: I had the biggest catch of the day. It was a sea-star. Chris actually partook in an even bigger catch, as he helped a local fisherman get a seagull off his fishing line. Technically, that one didn't count.  We caught about ten crabs of which one was big enough to eat. One of the locals had pity on us and gave us a monster dungeness crab. That one counted as mine.  Especially, since Patrick lost my crab ring on the last toss of the day.  Now I'll have to use one of the scars on my finger as a reminder to tell my crazy crab stories to people. We bought a big pot to cook the crabs at our campground.  The crabs were minuscule (with the exception of the monster dungeness crab I caught...see above) and they probably would have tasted better if we had butter and garlic. Good thing we went out for pizza before setting up camp. Gotta love the great outdoors. Oh, and we left the pot with the uneaten crabs next to our campfire. Bad idea, as our tent side was infested with crows by 7am. I had no idea how much noise a few dozen crows can make.  Anyway, it was a great time. Check out my flickr account for more pictures of crabs, seagulls, dead minks and the intern.
  Team stupid (Intern, German, Engineer)  and two guest members (Jim, Chris) went crabbing in Newport, Oregon this weekend. Newport is on the Oregon Coast, as most crabs can be found in the ocean. Once we arrived in Newport, we went to a local sporting goods store and studied up on the sport of crabbing. We were under the impression that we we’d have to rent a boat and paddle out on the open ocean, but apparently there were plenty of crabs to be caught just off the pier. Or so we thought… Equipped with three crabbing rings, a couple of dead minks, half a dozen of salmon heads and 48 cans of Coors Light (you have to stay hydrated); our athletic journey began at about 3pm. Ten hours later, here’s what had happened: I had the biggest catch of the day. It was a sea-star. Chris actually partook in an even bigger catch, as he helped a local fisherman get a seagull off his fishing line. Technically, that one didn’t count.  We caught about ten crabs of which one was big enough to eat. One of the locals had pity on us and gave us a monster dungeness crab. That one counted as mine.  Especially, since Patrick lost my crab ring on the last toss of the day.  Now I’ll have to use one of the scars on my finger as a reminder to tell my crazy crab stories to people. We bought a big pot to cook the crabs at our campground.  The crabs were minuscule (with the exception of the monster dungeness crab I caught…see above) and they probably would have tasted better if we had butter and garlic. Good thing we went out for pizza before setting up camp. Gotta love the great outdoors. Oh, and we left the pot with the uneaten crabs next to our campfire. Bad idea, as our tent side was infested with crows by 7am. I had no idea how much noise a few dozen crows can make.  Anyway, it was a great time. Check out my flickr account for more pictures of crabs, seagulls, dead minks and the intern.